Urban Decay Electric Palette: Review and Swatches

Hello Readers!

So guess what I got in the mail today, my new Urban Decay Electric Palette! For the last few years, many of Urban Decay’s client base has been left unimpressed by their Naked Palettes, as the company was founded on more bold and risky shadows and pigments. This Spring, Urban Decay  released a long awaited color palette, the Electric Palette.

The Electric Palette is fitted with 10  bold and neon, shimmer and matte pressed pigments. These are not your average eye shadow as Urban Decay has made claims that they had to reformulate the product as their original eye shadow formula was not cutting it. Two of the shades, Revolt and Chaos, are being reintroduced in the Electric palette, however the other eight are entirely new. There was much debate surrounding the release of the Electric Palette, as  half of the pigments used in the eye shadows (particularly Slowburn, Savage, Urban, and Jilted) use pigments are aren’t approved for use around the eye area by the United States FDA. Urban Decay clearly prints this warning on the back of the palette and includes a warning in the packaging notifying the buyer that they are in fact not approved for eyes. Although they are not approved in the United States, they are approved for use in Canada and the European Union. I would say, that if you have a history of being sensitive to eye products, then you may want to steer clear of this product, otherwise lets get electric!

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So here it is. It is a black acrylic palette that is very much different from Urban Decay’s recent Naked palettes, and I would say more similar to their Vice 2 palette. The Electric palette seems to be made of the same sturdy plastic as Vice 2 as well as use the same method of printing the design directly onto the palettes surface. Different than the Vice 2 or the Naked Palettes, instead of a snap closure the Electric palette has a Magnetic closure which I think is nice and attributes to the palettes sleekness. The palette also seems to be relatively smaller, about half the size (in height) compared to Vice 2. If you hold out your hand and put your fingers together, that’s about how big the palette is.

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Here’s a detail of the magnetic closure and printing onto the palette.

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Here’s the palette open. I think it is a very well designed palette. Unlike the Vice 2, Electric has the same sturdy plastic inside, so I don’t feel like the pans are going to move around or pop out. It has a very large mirror taking up the entire top of the palette, a feature adopted after complaints regarding the original Naked Palette. Between the two rows of pigments there is a well that holds a dual ended eye shadow brush. One side is your average flat eye shader brush, while the other is a flat detail or smudge brush. From the little time I have spent playing with it, the brush doesn’t seem like anything special, its not the softest or best eye shadow brush I have used. I like the idea of the detail brush, I don’t have one like it in my collection as is so that may be why.

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Swatches:

All swatches are on NC15 skin. Urban Decay Primer Potion under top half of swatches, bare skin on bottom half.

 

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Indoor light, No Flash. L-R: Thrash, Freak, Urban, Jilted, Chaos, Fringe, Savage, Slowburn, Gonzo, and Revolt.

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Indoor Light, With Flash. L-R: Thrash, Freak, Urban, Jilted, Chaos, Fringe, Savage, Slowburn, Gonzo, and Revolt.

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Detail. Indoor Light, No Flash. Top Row of Palette (L-R) Fringe, (bright metallic teal) Savage, (bright hot pink matte) Slowburn (bright red-orange matte with floating pearl), Gonzo (bright turquoise matte with floating tonal pearl), and Revolt (bright metallic silver shimmer with silver glitter).

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Detail. Indoor Light, With Flash. Top Row of Palette (L-R) Fringe, (bright metallic teal) Savage, (bright hot pink matte) Slowburn (bright red-orange matte with floating pearl), Gonzo (bright turquoise matte with floating tonal pearl), and Revolt (bright metallic silver shimmer with silver glitter).

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Detail. Indoor Light, No Flash. Bottom Row of Palette (L-R): Thrash (bright lime green matte with floating pearl), Freak (bright green shimmer with gold shift), Urban (bright metallic purple), Jilted (bright metallic fuchsia with blue shift), and Chaos (bright blue matte with floating  tonal pearl).

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Detail. Indoor Light, With Flash. Bottom Row of Palette (L-R): Thrash (bright lime green matte with floating pearl), Freak (bright green shimmer with gold shift), Urban (bright metallic purple), Jilted (bright metallic fuchsia with blue shift), and Chaos (bright blue matte with floating tonal pearl).

Final Thoughts: 

I really love this palette, even for under the few hours that I have had it. I cant wait to really use the pigments and experiment with some different looks. From the time that I spent playing with it and swatching today, I have already noticed how important it will be to prime your eyes with this formula. As you can see with Chaos, there is a huge difference in color intensity with and without primer. Urban Decay is known for its super velvety and pigmented shadows, and these definitely live up to that expectation. I would say that the few shadows that are matte, Savage and Chaos, are a bit more chalky than I would like, however with a primer it shouldn’t pose a problem.

Pros:

  • Pigmented
  • Variety of tone and finish
  • Packaging
  • Formula

Cons:

  • Not wearable for an everyday basis
  • Formula of Savage and Chaos are noticeably different (more chalky) than the others
  • The brush, I feel as though Urban Decay could have done a better job making it more similar to the included brushes in the Naked Palette.

The Math:

The Electric Palette is currently only sold online at  Urban Decay for $49.00USD. It holds 10 pressed pigments which are each .04oz. This translates to approximately $122.50USD per ounce. A normal Urban Decay shadow if bought on its own, holds .05 oz of product and retails for $18.00USD. This translates to approximately $360USD per ounce. If you were to purchase 10 Urban Decay shadows separately in the hopes of creating a similar palette it would cost you $180.00USD, thats a difference of $130.00USD. From the way I see it, buying the palette is a much better deal.

XO – Untitled-1

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9 thoughts on “Urban Decay Electric Palette: Review and Swatches

    • I admit that the colors are intimidating. I’m currently shooting a tutorial that I will post tomorrow on how to incorporate a pop of color into your everyday look so stay tuned! Thanks for reading ❤

  1. I just can’t decide on this. I don’t see myself actually reaching for this that often and my eyes are super sensitive. I loved this review though. The swatches are gorgeous. I’m just too iffy about it right now.

    • Thank you for reading it! I agree that its a palette that won’t get much use but I love Urban Decay and figured if I wanted bright eye shadows than these would be the ones to get. Hopefully either Ulta or Sephora will stock it and you can play around with it in the store!

  2. Great swatches! IMO the brush was designed for patting rather than blending as many of the shades in this palette respond better to patting and lose some of their intensity when blended.

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